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Monday Maps #3: Water Mill

February 3, 2020 5 comments

Nearly every village of any size will have a mill for grinding grain. Windmills are popular in the Wasteland and other flat, windy areas, but everywhere else, a water mill uses the power of a nearby river. The mill is a vital part of the village economy, and the miller is a respected member of the community, turning raw grain into saleable flour for a percentage of the yield.

A water mill is essentially a large machine set inside a building, and it can be a dangerous place for the unwary – especially in a fight. Even if the wheels are not turning, they present hard an unforgiving obstacles in unlooked-for places; if the mill is in operation, their gears can snag clothes and crush their wearers.

And of course, there is that big wheel outside, for those who want to recreate the iconic sequence fromĀ Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest - The Big Wheel Fight

This diagram is from 19th-century America, but the principles of siting a watermill and directing the flow of water are unchanged from the Middle Ages:

mill-diagram

These two images give an idea of the interior layout:

 

WFRP Maps Water Mill

Borrowed from the web site of David Darling (https://www.daviddarling.info/index.html). No challenge to copyright intended.

Watermill machinery

A side view. Notice how the central shaft drives not only the millstones but also the top floor winch, used for hauling sacks up grain up for milling. Drawing by Pippa Miller, borrowed from Norfolk Mills (http://www.norfolkmills.co.uk/watermill-machinery.html). No challenge to copyright intended.

…and this more complex map includes floorplans that can easily be adapted for use in a game. It is borrowed from the Mills Archive, which has plans and drawings of many other English water mills.

WFRP Water mill

The mill at Barford St. Michael, Oxfordshire. Borrowed from the Mills Archive (https://catalogue.millsarchive.org/watermill-at-barford-st-michael). No challenge to copyright intended.

Monday Maps #2

January 27, 2020 9 comments

It’s Monday, and here’s another map. This time, it’s from Francois Beauregard, a.k.a. Built4ever on Deviant Art. I know nothing about this artist, but the Deviant Art page is a huge trove of maps and building plans. It is well worth a visit.

Here, we have a nice little row of buildings that might be found in one of the classier areas of a fantasy city. They could be little boutique shops, perhaps with modest accommodation upstairs: shopkeepers are seldom the same class as their customers, even if they live alongside them. I particularly like the little alley entrance in the middle of the block, which could lead to all manner of intriguing locations, from the hidden oasis of a courtyard cafe to a simple yard for receiving and organizing stock. I’m sure you can come up with many other ideas.

storefronts_for_the_clove__a_town_center_by_built4ever_d5mmlw6-fullview (1)

 

Monday Maps #1

January 20, 2020 8 comments

It’s been my experience that a GM can never have too many maps, so I plan to post #MondayMaps every week from now on until I run out of images to share.

They will come from various sources, both old and comparatively modern. Some of the newer ones – old-looking designs for 20th-century houses – will include rooms that are not in period for a medieval fantasy game, but the basic layouts can still be useful. A few caption changes, and you’re off.

If you are like me and can’t draw anything beyond a bath, a curtain, and a conclusion, I hope you will find these useful. And if you have any great sources of RPG-friendly mappage that you’re willing to share with the rest of us, please post in the Comments section below.

This is the first one that caught my eye, probably because the style of the elevation drawing looks so much like one from theĀ WFRP 1st edition rulebook. It could work for the home of a merchant or other well-to-do burgher in a small town or village, where there is enough space for its sprawling layout. It might also become an inn, with the great hall serving as a tap-room, a snug bar off the entryway, and the upstairs bedrooms rented out to guests.

I would probably add a dividing wall between the kitchen and the great hall, because medieval-level cooking was a smoky and smelly business. The bathrooms could become additional bedrooms – especially in an inn – and/or storage rooms.

Anyway – enjoy,and let me know whether you would like to see more maps like this.

Original image is 1280 x 1743. To enlarge, right-click and open in a new tab.